INTP - Introverted, iNtuitive, Thinking, Perceiving

"Ingenious Problem Solvers"
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I am a conceptual problem solver. I am intensely intellectual and logical with flashes of creative brilliance.

Outwardly quiet, reserved and detached, I am inwardly absorbed in analyzing problems. I am critical, precise and skeptical. I try to find and use principles to understand my many ideas. I like conversation to be logical and purposeful and may argue to the point of hairsplitting just for fun. Only logical reasoning convinces me.

I am an ingenious and original thinker. I prizes intelligence in myself and have a strong drive for personal competence and am interested in challenging others to become more competent as well. I am primarily interested in seeing possibilities beyond what is currently known, accepted or obvious. I like to develop models for improving the way things are or solving difficult problems. I think in extremely complex ways and I am better able to organize concepts and ideas than I am able to organize people. My ideas are often so complex that I have difficulty communicating and making others understand them.

Highly independent, I enjoy speculative and imaginative activities. I am flexible and open-minded and am more interested in finding creative yet sound solutions to problems than I am in seeing those solutions made into reality.

POSSIBLE BLIND SPOTS

Because I rely so heavily on my logical analysis, I can overlook what matters to others. If something is not logical, I run the risk of dismissing it, even if it is important to me. Admitting to myself what I really care about will help me stay in touch with my true feelings.

I am excellent at detecting flaws in an idea, but am more reticent about expressing my appreciation. I can get bogged down on a minor flaw in one part of the plan and keep the entire project from moving toward completion because I refuse to let one illogical point remain within the whole. When I turn my highly honed critical thinking skills on the people around me, my naked honesty may translate into unintended hurtfulness. I need to be told and need to learn to ask what matters emotionally to others.

Because I am fascinated with solving problems, I tend to be impatient with routine details and may lose interest in a project and never complete it if it requires too much follow through and attention to detail. Turning my energy outward will enable me to gain sufficient practical knowledge to make my ideas workable and acceptable to other people.

I sometimes feel inadequate when I try to live up to my own high standards or perfection. Learning to share those feelings with someone else can help me get a more realistic and objective view of myself. 

THE 3 MOST IMPORTANT THINGS FOR ME TO FOCUS ON ARE: 


1. Become better organized

2. Be patient with less intelligent people

3. Work on improving my social skills


MY STRENGTHS

-Eagerness to ‘think outside the box” and consider new possibilities
-Ability to understand very complex and highly abstract ideas
-Great creative problem-solving skills 

-Ability to see the big picture; implications of actions and ideas
-Independence; courage to take risks, try new things and overcome obstacles
-Ability to synthesize lots of information
-Intellectual curiosity and skills for getting information I need
-Ability to analyze things logically even under stress
-Great confidence and drive to continually increase my knowledge
-Objectivity; ability to address issues without taking them personally
-Confidence in my ideas and vision

MY WEAKNESSES

-Tendency towards disorganization -Dislike of doing repetitive tasks
-Overconfidence; I may misrepresent my abilities or experience
-Impatience with unimaginative and/or incompetent people
-Dislike of doing things in traditional or established manner
-Tendency to lose interest in projects once problems are solved
-Difficulty communicating complex ideas simply
-Tendency to be so theoretical that I ignore or miss the realities
-Undisciplined about attending to and following through on important details
-Impatience with structures and people who are too rigid


MOVE MY PLANS OUT OF THE CONCEPTUAL STAGE AND INTO PRACTICE

-Once I have developed an innovative idea, ask myself how realistic it is. Is there time to get all I’ve imagined done? Is it possible to create what I have dreamed up? Decide on and hold myself to a timetable to implement my ideas.
-Develop a step-by-step plan that includes all the facts (timetable, questions to ask, reminder to send follow-up notes, etc) so I will be more likely to attend to important details.

ESTABLISH REALISTIC OBJECTIVES AND GOALS BASED UPON WHAT IS PRACTICAL, NOT ON WHAT MY CONFIDENCE TELLS ME IS POSSIBLE

-Remember that, depending on my level of experience, I may underestimate how long a project will take to complete. Knowing that from the start and reminding myself of it will help keep me from becoming discouraged and disinterested if the project takes longer than anticipated.
-Ask for the support from a friend when I find my impatience mounting and/or confidence waning.

MAKE SURE I DON’T APPEAR CONDESCENDING OR ARROGANT TO OTHERS

-Remember, blunt honesty can be perceived as rudeness
-Pay close attention to how others perceive me. Ask someone I trust to give me an honest appraisal of my perceived attitude.
-Take the time to listen fully to people before forming an opinion about them. Make it a goal to establish rapport early in conversations and relationships in general.

FOLLOW THROUGH ON IMPORTANT DETAILS OF SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS

-Social niceties, thank-you notes, follow-up calls etc. are important so I don’t seem aloof.

DON’T PUT OFF MAKING A DECISION

-After I have spent the necessary time considering my options and clarifying my needs and skills, take action! Discard less attractive options and decide to actively pursue the good ones.
-Don’t wait so long to decide that I inadvertently eliminate an opportunity by procrastinating.
-If possible, delegate routine or mundane tasks to others
-Make sure I have enough uninterrupted time to develop my ideas and think things through.
-Find other creative people to bounce my ideas off
-Arrange to have flexible hours
-Find support people who are organized and good with details
-Take courses and seminars to continue to expand my expertise and credentials
-Surround myself with others whose talent and competence I respect


ADDITIONAL NOTES

INTPs lack follow-through and this can isolate their ideas from practical examination. Their notions become over-intellectualized and too abstract to be of practical benefit. With their sharp critical thinking and analytical abilities, INTPs tend to nit-pick, hair-split, and generally overdo simple issues. Their desire for accuracy and precision exacerbates any error they may perceive in themselves or in others — they are, in other words, highly self-critical. Wanting to be competent and know everything, their standards grow increasingly higher. When fear of failing becomes overly pronounced, INTPs are quick to feel unintelligent, slow, and powerless.

If stress continues, the INTP's mind seems to freeze and block out the vital information it has worked so hard to accumulate. Their creative juices stop flowing and they suffer from stage fright, writers block, and a general inhibition of their ingenious thinking and fluent language skills. Preoccupied with performance failure, INTPs become self-consciously distracted in anticipation of their failure. If the stress becomes too overwhelming, the fear of blanking out prevents them from taking risks in areas they desire to succeed in. Attempting to avoid incompetence, they fail to gain the expertise and mastery they so desperately need.

 

To learn more about your personality type, purchase the book, "DO WHAT YOU ARE" by Barbara Barron-Tieger & Paul Tieger

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